Archive for Ancient Fathers

Synods: Witness not with your words, but your actions.

At the Eastern Synod the following values are proclaimed:
1. Praising and worshipping God
2. Taking care of other believers within our faith-communities
3. Witness to those outside our faith-communities.
These are common values that most Christians would agree with, but I would like to qualify something about the third value of wittness to those outside our faith-communities.
a. Are we willing to die for this witness?
b. Do we also take care of people outside our faith-communities?
In the first three centuries of the Christian era Christian communities grew from 120 worshippers in Jerusalem to a few million across the Roman Empire. This happened despite the fact ….
 that Christianity were first viewed only as a sect within Judaism,
 that they were later viewed as an illegal religion because Jewish believers made it clear that Christianity was not to be seen as a form of Judaism,
 that Christians were accused of eating human flesh and drinking blood (Baptism and Communion/Eucharist/Nagmaal).
a. This happened despite the fact that from time to time Christians were persecuted and killed for their faith.  It is generally accepted that one of the major reasons Christianity grew was the way in which Christians accepted death by martyrdom. It was Tertullian (one of the big early Latin Church Fathers) that made the statement that “the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church”. It is interesting that the word martyr (μάρτυς) that we use so often for referring to somebody who died/suffered for a cause originally meant witness. This shows how willing many early Christians were to die for their witness, and did not just witness with words.
b. It is also generally accepted that if we look at the first three centuries of growth in Christians despite the persecutions was due to the willingness of Christians to reach out to the destitute, the cast-aways, the sick of ancient society. This was probably because of Jesus’ own willingness to reach out to these people despite cultural rules prohibiting this. Christians cared for widows, the poor, thrown away babies, ill people like lepers. Christians started ancient hospitals to care for poor even after it became the religion of the empire. When Julian, son of Emperor Constantine, became emperor he wanted to bring back the old Roman religions. The problem he had was that these religions did not care for these destitute people. He knew that the Roman religions would not be able to reassert themselves if they were not willing to act like the Christians of the first three centuries. Christians took care of people outside their faith-communities through their love and care for non-Christians, not only by witnessing through words.
Ancient Christians did not do this so that there numbers would grow, but simply because this was part of their human DNA (in flesh and spirit). Similarly Future Christians should re-sequence their DNA. Christians are not to witness only in words, but by their actions.
In fact I would propose to restate the first mentioned three values as follows.
1. Praising and worshipping God
2. Taking care of other believers within our faith-communities
3. Witness by Words, Suffering and Taking care of those outside our faith-communities.
What do you think?
At the Eastern Synod the following values are proclaimed:
1. Praising and worshipping God
2. Taking care of other believers within our faith-communities
3. Witness to those outside our faith-communities.
These are common values that most Christians would agree with, but I would like to qualify something about the third value of wittness to those outside our faith-communities.
a. Are we willing to die for this witness?
b. Do we also take care of people outside our faith-communities?
In the first three centuries of the Christian era Christian communities grew from 120 worshippers in Jerusalem to a few million across the Roman Empire. This happened despite the fact ….
 that Christianity were first viewed only as a sect within Judaism,
 that they were later viewed as an illegal religion because Jewish believers made it clear that Christianity was not to be seen as a form of Judaism,
 that Christians were accused of eating human flesh and drinking blood (Baptism and Communion/Eucharist/Nagmaal).
a. This happened despite the fact that from time to time Christians were persecuted and killed for their faith.  It is generally accepted that one of the major reasons Christianity grew was the way in which Christians accepted death by martyrdom. It was Tertullian (one of the big early Latin Church Fathers) that made the statement that “the blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church”. It is interesting that the word martyr (μάρτυς) that we use so often for referring to somebody who died/suffered for a cause originally meant witness. This shows how willing many early Christians were to die for their witness, and did not just witness with words.
b. It is also generally accepted that if we look at the first three centuries of growth in Christians despite the persecutions was due to the willingness of Christians to reach out to the destitute, the cast-aways, the sick of ancient society. This was probably because of Jesus’ own willingness to reach out to these people despite cultural rules prohibiting this. Christians cared for widows, the poor, thrown away babies, ill people like lepers. Christians started ancient hospitals to care for poor even after it became the religion of the empire. When Julian, son of Emperor Constantine, became emperor he wanted to bring back the old Roman religions. The problem he had was that these religions did not care for these destitute people. He knew that the Roman religions would not be able to reassert themselves if they were not willing to act like the Christians of the first three centuries. Christians took care of people outside their faith-communities through their love and care for non-Christians, not only by witnessing through words.
Ancient Christians did not do this so that there numbers would grow, but simply because this was part of their human DNA (in flesh and spirit). Similarly Future Christians should re-sequence their DNA. Christians are not to witness only in words, but by their actions.
In fact I would propose to restate the first mentioned three values as follows.
1. Praising and worshipping God
2. Taking care of other believers within our faith-communities
3. Witness by Words, Suffering and Taking care of those outside our faith-communities.
What do you think?

Imitators not followers (1)

When people talk about parenthood they often talk about parents telling kids not to do as they do, but to do as they say. We also know that this is never successful. It is simply not an effective way of teaching behaviour. Kids tend to FOLLOW the examples of their parents. Parents have to model new behaviour, which is taught by words and deeds.

But this post is not about parenthood. It is about imitating and following someone, usually a significant person like a parent or philosopher. When you think of the word follow what comes to mind?

  1. Someone literally walking behind someone else to where-ever they go.
  2. Someone following the teaching/wisdom of someone else.
  3. Someone following another person’s way of life- to imitate.

I must be honest that for me nr. 3 never came to mind. It was mostly nr. 2 and sometimes I unconsciuosly practised nr. 3.  I would characterise nr. 3 with the word imitate. When I think of the word follow however, imitation does not come to mind, though in Merriam Webster’s English Dictionary imitate is a category  of follow. For me imitation is however more descriptive of nr. 3 than simply to follow. Follow has a multitude of interpretations, while imitate is limited in its interpretation, and thus more specific in how we should understand a call to imitate vs. a call to follow. Do kids follow their parents or imitate them? Sometimes they do all 3 above mentioned options and it is fine to say follow. Other times they imitate and we should specify it as such, especially when referring to following someone’s actions.

People follow many people today and even imitate some. We have a culture of people following the actions of movie stars and singers. Some follow superficially by reading publications like People Magazine and watching Entertainment News. Some like what they hear stars say and might even structure their philosophy of life in accordance to this, some of it good and some bad. Some will follow these stars and be indicted as Peeping Toms. And how about those Elvis impersonators. Now that’s imitation. Such a pity that they can’t sell albums like Elvis did.

I read that the sales of Portuguese Water dogs are up in the UK due to Barack Obama and his family having one. Soccer fans in South-East Asia will have a David Becham haircut. Indian Cricket supporters will worship Sachin Tendulkar as a Hindu god due to his special cricketing abilities. However some follow, others imitate.

Recently I read John Chrysostom’s homily on 1 Thessalonians 1:6. John Chrysostom is probably one of the best known fathers of the Greek church living at the turn of the 4th century AD. His name actually means “John with the golden mouth”, which was a nickname he received due to his prowess in preaching. Apparently he had a way with words. Now it has to be said that I read an English translation of this homily by Philipp Schaff (Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers).

But the translation tickled me since I could not remember reading this translation of 1 Thess 1:6 before. It was not part of my memory’s RAM or ROM. So I looked up 1 Thess 1:6 in the original Greek text (NA27/UBS4), and compared this to a few translations. Some translations said something like: “You are followers of us and of the Lord“. The NCV read: “And you became like us and like the Lord“. However the greek plural noun μιμηταὶ (mimētai) used here means “Imitators“. The original stem of the noun is the same as that of mime. According to Paul people are called not only to follow Jesus’ teachings, but to imitate Jesus, and others like Paul, who also imitated Jesus. Imitation is an action, not a concept (as sometimes intended by follow).

This in my opinion is a much richer understanding of Jesus’ call to people to follow Him. Next time I will continue to look at how/in what things it is that people are called to imitate Crist, but feel free to lay an egg or two.